CHAN Po Fung
We Left Trace On Each Other, 2013
Mixed Media

We Left Trace On Each Other (CNY, HKD), 2013 Coins (1989 CNY 5 Cents, 1983 HKD 1 Dollar) A work created before the Umbrella Movement. 1983. The year of the establishment of Hong Kong Linked Exchange Rate System. While Hong Kong was still a British colony, HK dollar linked to US dollar. During the past decades, Hong Kong performed perfectly as an entrepot free trade hub. Meanwhile, this was a year China and Britain negotiating the future of Hong Kong. 1989. The year of June Forth Incident. Students calling for freedom and justice were killed—marked a dark age under the Chinese communist rule. 1988. The year of my birth. During my childhood, the new generation Hongkongers were under the fear of the handover of Hong Kong sovereignty to China and resistance to communist ideology; meanwhile, still living in stability under a society with trust of freedom and justice. Today. Hong Kong has returned to its “motherland”. A large portion of local industries is leaned on mainland tourists. The fine system and values established during colonial era are vanishing and swaying. I squeeze the 1983 colonial coin onto the 1989 Chinese Renminbi with a roller, leaving a trace on each other. This depicts not only my entangled and repelling feeling of the hybridized identities, also a sorrow to the involuntary future of Hong Kong; concurrently, I can feel the fermentation of a new identity among Hong Kong people.

We Left Trace On Each Other (CNY, HKD), 2013
Coins (1989 CNY 5 Cents, 1983 HKD 1 Dollar)

A work created before the Umbrella Movement.

1983. The year of the establishment of Hong Kong Linked Exchange Rate System. While Hong Kong was still a British colony, HK dollar linked to US dollar. During the past decades, Hong Kong performed perfectly as an entrepot free trade hub. Meanwhile, this was a year China and Britain negotiating the future of Hong Kong.

1989. The year of June Forth Incident. Students calling for freedom and justice were killed—marked a dark age under the Chinese communist rule.

1988. The year of my birth. During my childhood, the new generation Hongkongers were under the fear of the handover of Hong Kong sovereignty to China and resistance to communist ideology; meanwhile, still living in stability under a society with trust of freedom and justice.

Today. Hong Kong has returned to its “motherland”. A large portion of local industries is leaned on mainland tourists. The fine system and values established during colonial era are vanishing and swaying. I squeeze the 1983 colonial coin onto the 1989 Chinese Renminbi with a roller, leaving a trace on each other. This depicts not only my entangled and repelling feeling of the hybridized identities, also a sorrow to the involuntary future of Hong Kong; concurrently, I can feel the fermentation of a new identity among Hong Kong people.